10 Days of Halloween: Day 9 – A Short Story of Fright

Hello ghouls and monstrosities! 

It’s that time of year again – Halloween! 

I will be posting ten posts all about Halloween, counting up to the night itself! 

Comment below, follow me and enjoy! 

Muhahahahaha 

SanMo - Halloween - Pumpkin - JackoLantern 7

~ * ~ 

Short horror stories are all the rage right now. 

Don’t believe me? Check out posts here, here and here for some terrifyingly great two-minute short stories! 

As for mine, here’s my tale for 2014:

Corner of her eye

 

It started as something flimsy.

A slight movement. A quick flurry right in the corner of her eye.

She would be watching television or reading a new book, her whole focus solely on the thing in front of her when out of nowhere, there would be something in the corner of her eye. Something silent and quick – there for a moment, but when she cautiously nudged her eyes towards it, would disappear.

She thought nothing of it, because whenever she turned to see what it was, there was nothing there to make anything of.

Sometimes it would be a slow crawling thing, a vague sensation in her peripheral of a ivory coloured slug that was sliding slowly up the side of her eyeballs, just out of sight.

Other times it would be a shadowy thing – starting small and growing outwards until she had to look – despite a growing apprehension in her belly that she shook her head at when she finally turned her head to find thin air.

Still other times there was something sudden and fast – something that came from nowhere, a pinprick in the distance and then crashed into the invisible barrier of her sightlines, shouting without sound or words to be heard. Her heart would snap upwards, lodging in her throat and she would catch her breath and twitch her head to the side, as if braced for impact. But nothing ever came of it.

When she finally, carefully, inched her face towards the thing that she had sworn had been there a moment before, she would find only what she expected to see, the thing at the corner of her eyes gone – if it were ever there at all.

She grew, as girls tend to do, and with her growth spurts so too grew the frequency of the things at the corners of her eyes. The slow clambering sensations grew larger still, their lack of speed suddenly menacing and foreboding. The shadowy things, somehow grew darker. And the propelling things were so sudden and forceful now, that she had actually stumbled as she walked to her car, her equilibrium shattered as she leaned against a pole, her mind frantically coping with the fact there was nothing there, even though her whole body tingled with awareness of someone or something.

She told no one, save her roommate, after such an incident elicited an involuntary yelp from her as she crossed the kitchen floor, her eyes wide and fists clenched. Her roommate poked and prodded and needled until finally the girl mentioned the creep, the dark and the pushing.

“Go to an optometrist.” The roommate suggested. “It sounds like cataracts or something.”

The girl doubted this – she was too young for something that usually afflicted the very old. And yet still, she found herself in the optometrist waiting room, her eyes darting to each corner of the room frantically, the sterilized walls and softly padded carpet floors more disturbing than comforting.

“Floaters.”

The girl had no idea what the optometrist was saying, but that one word kept popping into his speech. She shook her head.

He nodded. “No, it’s quite common actually – I happened to see a couple of bumps on your eyeball at the back and floaters are an effect of that – not to worry, but if they get too intense – if you see spots for an extended period of time, come back and we’ll sort you out.”

And with that, she was released.

Floaters.

So innocuous sounding, so innocent.

What could something as banal sounding as a floater do to her?

She walked out of the building, the cool dusk beginning to settle around the city block, and towards her car. The light was that dark glow of evening, pinpricked with headlights of passing cars and the twitchy streetlamp in her way. The air promised snow and clouds.

From the corner of her eye, with more intensity than she’d ever experienced, came a flashing light that was blinding it seemed to come with its own cacophony of blaring sounds. Without a thought, reacting purely on instinct, she turned her head towards it.

“Well,” it said with pointed teeth dripping and shadows engulfing it. “I thought I’d never get your full attention!”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s